Published: March 2010
Author(s): Angela Drakakis-Smith, Graham Day, Howard Davis

Immigrants and minorities 28(1) pp 42-69

This article is based on an empirical baseline study undertaken in 2005 which examined the experience of ‘the English’ who have moved and settled into north-west Wales. The movement of the British/white groups and their experiences have been less of a subject for examination and yet a dispersal of ‘the English’/British as both immigrants and colonisers has occurred and is ongoing. Migration between the constituent countries of the UK and the movement of English people into Wales has been a long-standing and accepted practice; it has been resisted by some in the more Welsh parts of Wales as a continuing ‘colonisation’. The rise of devolution within the UK and the burgeoning Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) with its increasing powers for self governance is leading to a decline of English dominance in Wales. This essay explores the experiences of ‘the English’ in Wales as England's influence over Wales becomes diluted, the role of leader and led reversed, and as the ‘empire begins to bite back’ (with apologies to Paul Gilroy)

Tags
Keywords
English Migration, North-West Wales, Devolution, Community Cohesion, Identity, Minority Language