An Unequal Wales Seminar delivered by Dr Laura Jones, Dr Jesse Heley and Dr Shane Doheny, WISERD

Rural ageing is a highly significant issue for both policy makers and academics across Europe, with the growing older population of rural regions placing increased demands on service provision at a time of economic austerity. Experiences of rural ageing are not homogenous, however, with rural places being shaped in different ways by contemporary restructuring processes, whilst the rural elderly experience a diversity of situations, needs and expectations. 

This seminar drew on findings from several complimentary research projects to explore everyday lives and experiences of growing older in different rural places; considering how inequalities in social and material capital play a role in shaping older people’s perceptions and expectations both of rural service provision and of rural living more broadly. Specifically, quantitative and qualitative data collected as part of the Grey and Pleasant Land project was used to consider understandings and experiences of poverty through rural case studies in Wales and England. Research undertaken by WISERD then focused on social participation and volunteering amongst older members of rural communities, in the context of ongoing devolution of welfare responsibilities from the state.

Conclusions pointed towards the different factors involved in older people’s life choices, as well as the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in order to support the wellbeing of rural Wales’ ageing population.

An Unequal Wales Seminar delivered by Dr Robin Mann and Dr Stephen Drinkwater, WISERD

Previous research has indicated that there may be a labour market advantage for speakers of minority languages.

Evidence in support of this has been found for Welsh speakers in Wales by Drinkwater and O’Leary (1997) in terms of employment and Henley and Jones (2005) for earnings.   Various explanations have been suggested including educational policies and higher attainment, increased cognitive ability, bilingual policies in the workplace, employment shifts following economic restructuring and better networks and information flows (Day, 2002; Williams and Morris, 1999).

This paper will examine the labour market differences between Welsh and non-Welsh speakers by extending and updating the existing literature in two main ways.

Firstly, we use a mixed-methods approach by combining quantitative analysis of the Annual Population Survey (APS) with qualitative analysis of WISERD stakeholder data.   Secondly, we distinguish between labour market differences within the public and private sectors.   This is initially done by comparing the earnings and occupational achievements of Welsh speakers relative to non-Welsh speakers in both sectors using APS data, whilst also controlling for differences in personal and socio-economic characteristics.

These events are free to attend. To register your place, please r.s.v.p to rumbulra@cardiff.ac.uk

– See more at: http://www.wiserd.ac.uk/training-events/event/welsh-speakers-and-labour-market-2/?eID=40#sthash.FF2g3Juz.dpuf

An Unequal Wales Seminar delivered by Dr Robin Mann and Dr Stephen Drinkwater, WISERD

Previous research has indicated that there may be a labour market advantage for speakers of minority languages.

Evidence in support of this has been found for Welsh speakers in Wales by Drinkwater and O’Leary (1997) in terms of employment and Henley and Jones (2005) for earnings.   Various explanations have been suggested including educational policies and higher attainment, increased cognitive ability, bilingual policies in the workplace, employment shifts following economic restructuring and better networks and information flows (Day, 2002; Williams and Morris, 1999).

This paper will examine the labour market differences between Welsh and non-Welsh speakers by extending and updating the existing literature in two main ways.

Firstly, we use a mixed-methods approach by combining quantitative analysis of the Annual Population Survey (APS) with qualitative analysis of WISERD stakeholder data.   Secondly, we distinguish between labour market differences within the public and private sectors.   This is initially done by comparing the earnings and occupational achievements of Welsh speakers relative to non-Welsh speakers in both sectors using APS data, whilst also controlling for differences in personal and socio-economic characteristics.

These events are free to attend. To register your place, please r.s.v.p to rumbulra@cardiff.ac.uk

– See more at: http://www.wiserd.ac.uk/training-events/event/welsh-speakers-and-labour-market-2/?eID=40#sthash.FF2g3Juz.dpuf

Other events in the series: