Professor of Economics
Swansea University

Philip Murphy is a Professor of Economics in the Labour Economics Section in the School of Management at Swansea University. Before joining Swansea University in 1991, Professor Murphy held academic positions at the universities of Manchester, East Anglia, Aberdeen and IUPUI (USA).

He is an applied labour economist whose research interests span a number of areas including wage inequality the economics of discrimination, training, economic inactivity, spatial modelling, the dynamics of the national minimum wage, and the determinants of subjective wellbeing.


Unlocking the potential of the Welsh Local Labour Force Survey: an investigation into labour market transitions in Wales
The project aimed to highlight the potential value of an important but currently underutilised dataset, the Welsh Local Labour Force Survey (WLLFS). The main aim was to provide new evidence relating to labour market transitions in Wales. In terms of the analysis we propose t
Research Team:
Rhys Davies (Cardiff University), Stephen Drinkwater (University of Roehampton), David Blackaby (Swansea University), Melanie Jones (Cardiff University), Philip Murphy (Swansea University)
Wellbeing, Deprivation & Social Cohesion
Overview This project utilised a range of econometric techniques to investigate the nature of the relationship between the domains of individual subjective wellbeing, individual and household characteristics, work/life circumstances, and a range of indicators related to the
Research Team:
David Blackaby (Swansea University), Philip Murphy (Swansea University), Melanie Jones (Cardiff University), Prashant Gupta (Swansea University), James Healy (Swansea University), Samuel Brown (Swansea University)
Wales Housing Research Network
The Welsh Housing Research Network brings together researchers and research organisations in Wales in the field of housing. Researchers are exploring housing issues via a multitude of disciplines ranging from the social sciences and economics to architecture and health. More
Research Team:
Peter Mackie (Cardiff University), Philip Murphy (Swansea University), Scott Orford (Cardiff University), Paul Milbourne (Cardiff University)
The Gender Pay Gap in Wales
Aims The aims of the project were to examine the pay statistics for Wales, for 2008 and other relevant years to determine possible reasons for the widening of the pay gap between women and men. Methodology The research methodology was desk based analysis of published data se
Research Team:
David Blackaby (Swansea University), Philip Murphy (Swansea University), Nigel O'Leary (Swansea University), Sami Souabni
A Living Wage in Wales
This research aimed to improve understanding of the implications of introducing a living wage policy in Wales. The report to the Welsh Government can be viewed here .
Research Team:
David Blackaby (Swansea University), Philip Murphy (Swansea University)
Labour Market Implications of Changes in the Public Sector: Work Quality
Pay and Job Quality: Is the Grass Greener in the Public Sector ? The unadjusted public-private sector pay differential has attracted considerable political interest since the coalition government came to power in the UK in 2010. It has been used to justify changes to pay set
Research Team:
Philip Murphy (Swansea University), David Blackaby (Swansea University), Melanie Jones (Cardiff University), Victoria Wass, Gerald Makepeace, Alan Felstead
Labour Market Implications of Changes in the Public Sector
In 2010 the UK coalition Government committed itself to an active policy of fiscal consolidation designed to ‘eliminate’ the structural deficit by the end of the current parliament (HM Budget, March 2011). As part of their consolidation plans the Government announced its int
Research Team:
Philip Murphy (Swansea University), David Blackaby (Swansea University), Melanie Jones (Cardiff University), Victoria Wass, Gerald Makepeace, Alan Felstead
Labour Market Implications of Changes in the Public Sector: Inequality
T he UK gender Pay gap 1998-2013: What is the role of the public sector? The Quarterly Labour Force Survey was used to compare gender wage gap in the public and private sectors between 1998 and 2013 and to identify the contribution of the sectoral employment allocation to th
Research Team:
Philip Murphy (Swansea University), David Blackaby (Swansea University), Melanie Jones (Cardiff University), Victoria Wass, Gerald Makepeace, Alan Felstead
Labour Market Implications of Changes in the Public Sector: Public Sector Pay
Pay determination and outcomes in the public sector Data from the Labour Force Survey was used to investigate public sector wage differential in the UK 1994 to 2012. In the first of a set of analyses, three separate sub-periods are considered in detail, each characterise bro
Research Team:
Philip Murphy (Swansea University), David Blackaby (Swansea University), Melanie Jones (Cardiff University), Victoria Wass, Gerald Makepeace, Alan Felstead
Public-private sector pay differential in UK: A recent update
This document updates and extend our previous analysis on the public-private sector wage differential usingsix new quarters of Labour Force Survey (LFS) data. The data are split into two sub-samples - 2009Q1-2010Q4 and 2011Q-2012Q3. The results presented are based on a linea...
An investigation of the IFS public-private sector pay differential: A robustness check
The Chancellor of the Exchequer announced in the Autumn Statement of 2011 that the public sectorpay freeze would come to an end in 2012/13, with public sector pay awards of 1 per cent planned overthe next 2 years thereafter. Emphasis was also placed on making public sector p...
Report on Symposium: June 2012
Attendees were welcomed and introduced themselves. It was explained that this event wasthe first of a series co-funded by the ESRC, to be held in collaboration with the WalesInstitute for Social and Economic Research, Data & Method (WISERD). The aim of theseevents will be to...
Data & Methods | June 2012
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The employment and earnings of Britains senior citizen
Britain's senior citizens, in common with the rest of Europe, are the fastest growing age group among the population and the numbers working have grown substantially. In 2007 the numbers working at or beyond the state pension age (65 and over for men, 60 and over for women)...
Inequalities | September 2009